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Introduction


Introduction  |  Section A  |  Section B  |  Section C  |  Section D  |  Resources


CME Learning Outcomes (LO)

There are four Learning Outcomes for Unit 4.

You will:

  • LO 1: Understand policies and procedures for promoting children and young people’s positive behaviour
  • LO 2: Be able to promote children and young people’s positive behaviour
  • LO 3: Be able to manage inappropriate behaviour in children and young people
  • LO 4: Be able to respond to challenging behaviour in children and young people

Each of these Learning Outcomes is addressed in the four sections (ABCD) that follow the Introduction as well as through the five learning activities.


Introduction

As a music educator, you may work with large groups of children and young people, small groups or individuals. You may work as a visiting music educator, or at home.

  • Promoting positive behaviour is important in whichever context you work. If you work in a school or other educational establishment, there should be policies and procedures in place to promote children and young people’s positive behaviour and sanctions which you may be able to apply if necessary.
  • While you may not encounter challenging behaviour in your current working environment, it is important that you demonstrate an understanding of how to deal with it and how to promote positive behaviour.

As a music educator, you should be aware of the document titled, The importance of music: a national plan for music education (NPME).

  • In 2011, the then Secretary of State for Education, Michael Gove, and Ed Vaizey, the then Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries published the first National Plan for Music Education (NPME) which was developed on the basis of the recommendations put forward in the Henley Review of Music Education. This was undertaken by the then CEO of Classic FM, Darren Henley, at the request of the government.
  • Music Education Hubs were created in response to NPME requirements and the CME was developed by Arts Council England as stated in NPME.

WORKING WITH LARGE GROUPS

  • Children and young people enter the learning space with varying degrees of readiness to learn. You should enter it with a range of strategies to enable you to meet challenging behaviour, exercise an appropriate level of control and, through promoting positive behaviour, enable and facilitate musical learning.
  • You will need as much prior knowledge of individual children and young people as is necessary to inform how you manage the activity session or lesson. For example, where possible, make sure you know who will be in the session before you begin and any additional needs the learners may have.

WORKING WITH SMALL GROUPS OR INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS

  • It may seem that issues of challenging behaviour are unlikely to occur when you are working with a small group, or an individual, but while the behaviour displayed may be different it can be equally inappropriate and challenging.

Now, work through the four sections that follow and the five learning activities.


Introduction  |  Section A  |  Section B  |  Section C  |  Section D  |  Resources

Posted In  CME Unit 4

Kings College London-based a cappella group, The Rolling Tones

Music Education UK reviews the vocal extravaganza

The London A Cappella Festival (LACF) is an annual fixture on the UK choral scene, attracting performing groups from all over the world as well as hundreds of workshop participants and concert-goers. Based at Kings Place, with satellite events taking place at nearby LSO St Luke’s, the festival runs for four days and is an ambitious mix of concerts, workshops, children’s events and showcases.

Curated by a cappella supergroup, The Swingles, this year’s festival – the 9th – ran from 24-27 January 2018. Media partners, Music Education UK and sister site, Choral.ly attended on the last day, enabling us to sample workshops, showcases and the final concert.

What struck us first and foremost was the friendly, almost intimate, atmosphere of the event. Festival-goers were in evidence from the moment we arrived, hanging out on the ground floor of Kings Place or chilling in the basement where most of the action takes place. Riding down the escalator, we saw the foyer open up to reveal the showcase stage, situated between Hall 1 (where festival concerts take place) and Hall 2 (which hosts festival workshops). With Vocal Dimension Chorus’s showcase in full swing and an appreciative audience standing or lounging on banquettes or the floor to listen, applaud and sing along, there was a feeling that this festival is as much about chilled-out participation as spectating. Many of the people around us seemed to know each other and we sensed that people come here in groups – families, friends and, above all, fellow choir members.

All-female a cappella group, Vocal Dimension Chorus

All-female a cappella group, Vocal Dimension Chorus

This was echoed in the first workshop where participants were quick to shed bags, coats and even shoes in their eagerness to get comfy for the warm-up – a two-minute meditation-style exercise led by the beatboxer from all-female contemporary vocal group, Musae (stepping in at the last minute to cover for Huun-Huur-Tu, a throat-singing group from Tuvan on the Mongolian border, who’d had problems getting visas). While the rest of Musae watched from the stage, Mel Daneke and fellow singers, Jessie Litwin and Sam Creighton, led 80 of us in a session exploring what it takes to prepare for a performance. It’s always good to feel the fear and do it anyway and we found ourselves sharing some quite intimate experiences, including moving across the floor to music representing water, air, earth and fire, discussing where we feel confident and where fearful and, for eight lucky people, lip-synching a stage performance to a backing track! I found myself next to LACF’s Festival Patron, choirmaster and broadcaster, Gareth Malone, and was delighted to see him getting stuck in as we swam, flew, stomped and sizzled our way through the session.

Musae’s workshop

Musae’s workshop

The second workshop was a sit-down affair in which beatboxer supremos, Grace Savage and Hobbit, talked us through the basics of beatboxing. Not being as au fait with the contemporary a cappella scene as I might hope, it took me a while to work out why beatboxing had been given such a prominent spot in the festival until I realised that a cappella groups performing any kind of music with a groove need a ‘rhythm section’ and beatboxers provide that. I counted about 120 participants in the workshop and it was great to see everyone having a go at this most challenging of musical forms. As before, people were keen to get stuck in and the hall was soon full of impromptu vocal drum grooves and faux-electronic whistles and woofs. The audience had its fair share of beatbox aficionados, all keen to jump on stage and improvise with Grace and Hobbit, and, for me, this encapsulated the spirit of LACF – an event where lovers of a cappella can congregate to listen and learn, share and network and, above all, perform. You could almost feel the thirst for knowledge in the Q&A section and there was no sense that people felt intimidated – rather, this was a friendly community of a cappella brethren, united in the study and practice of group singing.

L-R: Grace Savage and Hobbit improvising with a member of the audience

Post-workshop, we hung out to three more showcase performances by NoVI, The Rolling Tones and The Gold Vocal Collective before making our way into Hall 1 for the final concert by The Swingles. Founded by Ward Swingle in 1963, this London-based group performs everything from Early Music and Bach to contemporary folk, pop and jazz. With effortless blending and consummate control, they are hugely impressive and well deserving of their reputation as masters of their craft. For me, the path they tread between their obvious classical training and the need for vocalese to sound ‘cool’ can be a little unconvincing at times but this is more than made up for by their ability to bring nuance to their dynamics. So many of the other performing groups ‘belted’ their numbers that it was a joy to listen to quiet as well as loud singing!

Contemporary a cappella group, The Gold Vocal Collective

The group was joined on stage towards the end of the night by many of the other festival headliners – including Musae and New York Voices – as well as Gareth Malone. The warm camaraderie between the performers and the audience confirmed that LACF is a labour of love and a place of sanctuary for the a cappella community. Roll on next year!


Header photo: Kings College London-based a cappella group, The Rolling Tones

Posted In  Event reviews

Jolly Music Handbooks

The Music Handbook Level 3

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Level 3 builds on the skills the children learned at Level 1 & 2, while still supporting the teacher every step of the way.

Suitable for children aged 7-10, The Music Handbook Level 3 builds on the lessons from Level 2.

The Handbook has 212 pages and includes 7 CDs with all teaching and song tracks. The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Level 3 also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • Includes four rhymes and 25 songs, including lots of old favourites
  • Reinforces the children’s knowledge of pitch names and handsigns and introduces lots of new rhythms
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Templates for puppets and rhythm activities

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Level 3.


Posted In  Teachers' books

Jolly Music Handbooks

The Music Handbook Level 2

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Level 2 builds on the skills the children learned at Level 1, while still supporting the teacher every step of the way.

Suitable for beginners aged 6-9 years, this book builds on the work begun at Beginner and Level 1.

The Handbook has 208 pages and includes 7 CDs with all teaching and song tracks. The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Level 2 also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • Includes 2 new rhymes and 8 new songs as well as lots of old favourites
  • Reinforces the children’s knowledge of pitch names and handsigns and introduces lots of new rhythms
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Templates for puppets and rhythm activities

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Level 2.


Posted In  Teachers' books

Jolly Music Handbooks

The Music Handbook Level 1

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Level 1 builds on the skills children have learned at Beginner’s Level, while still supporting the teacher every step of the way.

Suitable for beginners aged 5-8 years, who have completed The Music Handbook Beginners. The Handbook has 192 pages and includes 7 CDs with all teaching and song tracks.

The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Level 1 also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • 5 new rhymes and 14 new songs as well as lots of old favourites
  • Introduces the children to pitch names, pitch handsigns, rhythm names and notation
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Templates for puppets and rhythm activities
  • Suitable for children aged 5-8 who have completed Beginner’s level

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Level 1.


Posted In  Teachers' books

Jolly Music Handbooks

The Music Handbook Beginners

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Beginners has been developed so that any teacher can teach music to childreneven those without any musical experience.

Suitable for beginners aged 4-7 years, the Handbook includes 6 CDs with all teaching and song tracks.

The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Beginners also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • Photocopiable child assessment record
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Puppet templates

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Beginners.


“I have found the key to teaching SEN students is using multi-sensory, systematic, reinforced teaching methods.  Jolly Music is a perfect example of all of these three things combined together, making it a wonderful inclusive music education programme.”  – Karen Marshall, Music Educator (SpLD Specialist Music Teacher)


Posted In  Teachers' books

Jolly Music Handbooks

Jolly Music Big Book Level 3

+44 (0)20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Level 3 contains the complete collection 25 songs for Level 3 in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions. This 52 page big book has an integral fold-out stand is ideal for whole class singing. Your children will love the full-colour illustrations.

Posted In  Pupils' books

Jolly Music Handbooks

Jolly Music Big Book Level 2

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Level 2 contains the complete collection 25 songs for Level 2 in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions. This big book has an integral fold-out stand is ideal for whole class singing. Your children will love the full-colour illustrations.

Posted In  Pupils' books

Jolly Music Handbooks

Jolly Music Big Book Beginners

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Beginners contains the complete collection of 5 rhymes and 24 songs in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions or games. A perfect resource to help teach music to children!

Jolly Music Big Book Beginners is a perfect accompaniment to The Music Handbook. This full-colour big book is ideal for whole class use and comes with an integral fold-out stand.

Posted In  Pupils' books

Novello Guide to Sightreading

Key information

  • Title: The Novello Guide to Sight-Singing
  • What it is: Sight-singing guide and online resource
  • Authors: Ralph Allwood & Timothy Teague
  • Publisher: Novello & Co
  • Price information: £18.99-£19.99
  • Available from: Amazon.co.uk / Musicroom.com / Scorestore.co.uk (with a 5% discount)

Choral director, Brian Cotterill, reviews Novello’s new sight-singing guide

Ella Fitzgerald once said that ‘the only better thing than singing is more singing’. A major problem for so many potential singers though has always been how to sight-read. Sight-singing is different from sight-reading on other instruments because it involves pitching notes oneself, rather than ‘simply’ playing the correct note.

As a choral director, I have often found that the most useful singers in a choir are not necessarily those with the best voices but those who can sight-sing accurately.

This work – and it’s much more than just a book – is a fantastic publication. It can be used by students, teachers and choir directors alike. There is so much in it that it is, dare I say it, the ultimate resource.

Sight-reading has always been the scourge of music exam candidates. The Novello Guide to Sight-Singing should be in everyone’s music case. The authors have used their huge experience to produce the first truly interactive resource to teach the art of sight-singing.

The book

As a text book, this will be of immense use to singing teachers in lessons with their students but can also be used by students on their own, outside lessons. Although necessarily extremely detailed, the book guides the student through the theory and skills required to sight-sing effectively, notably rhythm, intervals, melodic shape etc. I particularly like the way the authors advise students how to pitch intervals – a common difficulty among singers.

The exercises are cleverly chosen from ‘real’ pieces of music and each one focusses on a particular aspect of sight-singing. The annotated musical examples in the book, while initially appearing quite daunting and reminiscent of university students’ analysis assignments, on closer inspection give a vast array of tips and techniques to improve one’s skills.

Screenshot 1

Additional Case Studies, Example 1

The book provides explanations, exercises and tips and tricks covering:

  • basic music theory
  • scales and stepwise motion
  • larger intervals and awkward leaps
  • fast and effective reading of choral scores
  • examples from popular choral repertoire
  • general good practice for choral singing

I don’t know of another book which brings such a thorough approach to the art of sight-singing. Singers are taught to notice things in a score as they sight-sing (arpeggios, scale passages, repeating patterns etc), aspects of sight-singing which are crucial.

Additional Case Studies, Example 2

Additional Case Studies, Example 2

The book is extremely thorough; indeed, perhaps a little too thorough for use by a student on his or her own. Nevertheless, for use with a teacher or by a choral director, it is a box of delights.

The online Soundcheck resource

The unique aspect of The Novello Guide to Sight-Singing is its online Soundcheck resource. By logging into SoundWise, not only is the whole book available as an E-book on screen but also all the exercises are available for practice, each pitched for both high and low voice.

Once the chosen Soundcheck exercise is on screen, the student can try to sing it (through the microphone of his or her computer) and the performance is then ‘marked’. The student can try each exercise as many times as he or she likes, hopefully improving his accuracy. ‘Stars’ are awarded to celebrate achievement.

Following a successful ‘performance’, the student is encouraged to do a ‘lap of honour’ by singing the exercise again. This helps confirm the skills used (and also checks that the previous performance wasn’t a fluke!).

SoundWise's Soundcheck resource

SoundWise’s Soundcheck resource

This online resource is of huge value and is the main thing which, for me, puts The Novello Guide to Sight-Singing in a different league from the old and crusty sight-singing books I have on my music shelves. Here, for the first time, the student can practise the art of sight-singing on his or her own with an online ‘teacher’ who marks every exercise instantly and will do so 24 hours a day – fantastic!

The SoundWise online aspect of The Novello Guide to Sight-Singing can be accessed on all media devices, including phone, tablet and personal computer, so is available for use anywhere – in a lesson, at home, in school etc – I even tried it in the bath!

In conclusion, I highly recommend The Novello Guide to Sight-Singing. It will no doubt establish itself as an extremely useful resource in the choral world. If I have one reservation, it would be that the book can appear too detailed for the student working alone, especially if he or she is young, but for use by adults, teachers and choral directors, it will doubtless prove invaluable. Ella Fitzgerald would have approved.


About the reviewer

Organist, pianist, choral director, composer and teacher, Brian Cotterill spent over seven years as Director of Music at Lanesborough School (the choir school of Guildford Cathedral) before becoming Director of Music at St Edmund’s School in Hindhead, Surrey, where he oversaw the running of seven choirs every week.

He has undertaken choir tours to Salzburg, Rome, Venice and Tuscany, which have included performances for Pope Benedict XVI. Brian is the official accompanist of Song Circle, a chamber choir formed from members of the BBC Symphony Chorus.

Web: http://briancotterill.webs.com
Email: brian.c@talktalk.net

Posted In  Publication reviews

Sing Up young singers © Michaela Greene

Sing Up Song Bank

+44 (0)20 7908 5148

Sing Up

Annual subscriptions: £60 (individual), £210 (school). Quoted prices exclude VAT.

About Sing Up membership

Sing Up membership provides access to the Sing Up Song Bank, with hundreds of specially arranged songs, teaching tools and supporting resources for all your singing needs, in and out of school.

The Sing Up Song Bank

  • Expertly arranged songs and warm ups to support young voices as they develop
  • Display songs by Age, Subject, Style, Music Topic, SEN and more: for easy searching!
  • Plus teaching notes and scores to help you teach songs well

Membership benefits

  • Song Bank credits
    Use your credits to take Sing Up songs offline and print out the sheet music
  • Unlimited plays of all songs
    Stream our collection online
  • Teaching resources, including song teaching notes, music projects, cross-curricular activity plans and assembly plans
    Use our resources to help achieve your learning objectives
  • A range of video content and tutorials
  • Logins for your whole staff team

Posted In  Online resources and  Teaching resources

Trinity Piano Syllabus 2018-20

Trinity College Piano Syllabus 2018-20

Trinity College London

June 2017

About the syllabus

The new Piano syllabus will be valid from 1 January 2018 to 31 December 2020.

  • New performance pieces at all levels, encompassing a wide range of musical styles
  • New technical work exercises at all levels, covering key areas of technique
  • Duets may now be selected from Initial to Grade 3
  • Pieces are only divided into groups at Grades 6-8; in the other grades, pieces can be chosen freely from the list
  • Revised own composition, aural and improvisation requirements

 

Posted In  Graded examinations

UK Music

UK Music: ‘Wish You Were Here 2017’

UK Music

Free

10 July 2017

Collating a vast amount of ticketing and other data from hundreds of venues, UK Music annually compiles this unrivalled insight into live music in every region of the UK and its impact on the local economy.


Posted In  Music industry reports