Introduction to the Certificate for Music Educators (CME)

Musicians' Union

7 July 2017

The level 4 Certificate for Music Educators (CME) is designed to help music educators demonstrate and gain recognition for their professional abilities, while also developing and consolidating their skills and knowledge.

It was launched to fill a gap: there was previously no qualification that could be taken by all music educators in any setting working with any musical genre. The CME is designed to address key principles of working as a music educator while tailoring these in way that is applicable to each learner’s specialism.

The CME is primarily awarded by Trinity College London through a network of centres. If you are reading this, it is because your centre uses learning materials provided by the Musicians’ Union. This website is where you will find materials for Units 4, 5 and 6 of the CME. Contact your centre if you have any difficulties accessing it. If you need more general information about the CME, your centre can also provide this for you.

Follow the links on the CME channel for the materials for Units 4, 5 and 6.


 

The Music Handbook Level 3

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Level 3 builds on the skills the children learned at Level 1 & 2, while still supporting the teacher every step of the way.

Suitable for children aged 7-10, The Music Handbook Level 3 builds on the lessons from Level 2.

The Handbook has 212 pages and includes 7 CDs with all teaching and song tracks. The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Level 3 also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • Includes four rhymes and 25 songs, including lots of old favourites
  • Reinforces the children’s knowledge of pitch names and handsigns and introduces lots of new rhythms
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Templates for puppets and rhythm activities

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Level 3.


The Music Handbook Level 2

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Level 2 builds on the skills the children learned at Level 1, while still supporting the teacher every step of the way.

Suitable for beginners aged 6-9 years, this book builds on the work begun at Beginner and Level 1.

The Handbook has 208 pages and includes 7 CDs with all teaching and song tracks. The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Level 2 also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • Includes 2 new rhymes and 8 new songs as well as lots of old favourites
  • Reinforces the children’s knowledge of pitch names and handsigns and introduces lots of new rhythms
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Templates for puppets and rhythm activities

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Level 2.


The Music Handbook Level 1

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Level 1 builds on the skills children have learned at Beginner’s Level, while still supporting the teacher every step of the way.

Suitable for beginners aged 5-8 years, who have completed The Music Handbook Beginners. The Handbook has 192 pages and includes 7 CDs with all teaching and song tracks.

The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Level 1 also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • 5 new rhymes and 14 new songs as well as lots of old favourites
  • Introduces the children to pitch names, pitch handsigns, rhythm names and notation
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Templates for puppets and rhythm activities
  • Suitable for children aged 5-8 who have completed Beginner’s level

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Level 1.


The Music Handbook Beginners

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£32.08 (£38.50 including VAT)

The Music Handbook Beginners has been developed so that any teacher can teach music to childreneven those without any musical experience.

Suitable for beginners aged 4-7 years, the Handbook includes 6 CDs with all teaching and song tracks.

The CDs provided with Jolly Music contain teaching tracks, that are intended for children to imitate, rather than sing along with, and they are therefore sung simply and without accompaniment in order to provide the best model for the children.

The Music Handbook Beginners also contains:

  • 30 clear, structured and sequenced lesson plans
  • Photocopiable child assessment record
  • Resources section with songs, rhymes, actions and games
  • Puppet templates

Visit the Jolly Learning website to hear samples of the tracks included in with The Music Handbook Beginners.


“I have found the key to teaching SEN students is using multi-sensory, systematic, reinforced teaching methods.  Jolly Music is a perfect example of all of these three things combined together, making it a wonderful inclusive music education programme.”  – Karen Marshall, Music Educator (SpLD Specialist Music Teacher)


Jolly Music Big Book Level 3

+44 (0)20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Level 3 contains the complete collection 25 songs for Level 3 in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions. This 52 page big book has an integral fold-out stand is ideal for whole class singing. Your children will love the full-colour illustrations.

Jolly Music Big Book Level 2

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Level 2 contains the complete collection 25 songs for Level 2 in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions. This big book has an integral fold-out stand is ideal for whole class singing. Your children will love the full-colour illustrations.

Jolly Music Big Book Level 1

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Level 1 contains the complete collection of 7 rhymes and 29 songs for Level 1 in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions or games. This big book has an integral fold-out stand is ideal for whole class singing. Your children will love the full-colour illustrations.

Jolly Music Big Book Beginners

+44 (0) 20 8501 0405

Jolly Learning Educational Publishing

Cyrilla Rowsell & David Viden

£25

Jolly Music Big Book Beginners contains the complete collection of 5 rhymes and 24 songs in a large easy-to-read format.

Each rhyme or song includes pulse marks to guide the children in performance, and pictures to remind them of the appropriate actions or games. A perfect resource to help teach music to children!

Jolly Music Big Book Beginners is a perfect accompaniment to The Music Handbook. This full-colour big book is ideal for whole class use and comes with an integral fold-out stand.

Music Education UK reviews the Bands of The Household Division’s annual concert at Cadogan Hall

‘What,’ I hear you ask, ‘is Music Education UK doing at a concert by the Massed Bands of the Household Division?’ It’s a cold and frosty night in Central London and here we are in our best bibs and tuckers rubbing shoulders with the Army’s finest – what’s the link?

Quite simply, it’s about careers. Specifically, careers in Army music. Forty new cadets sign up to play in an Army band every year. You can enrol as young as 16 and stay on till you’re 55. You get to train at the Royal Military School of Music, Kneller Hall, as well as to continue your studies at the London College of Music on the BA Hons or BMus course if you want. And you get to wear a cool uniform.

In fact, the uniform is what this annual concert at Cadogan Hall calls itself after – that and the well-known march by Lloyd Thomas. Scarlet and gold are the colours of the Household Division‘s parade uniform and they deliver military music on State Ceremonial occasions such as Trooping the Colour. Band members are drawn from the Corps of Army Music (CAMUS) and, according to Major General Ben Bathurst CBE in his foreword to tonight’s programme, ‘all of them are passionate about music’.

So it’s with a pleasant sense of anticipation that we settle into our seats and the lights dim to reveal not only the Massed Bands seated onstage but also an assortment of players dotted around the hall, poised to deliver a welcome fanfare. And what a fanfare it is! Stirringly performed by the State Trumpeters of the Household Cavalry Band, it’s a fitting start to what the Household Division’s website calls ‘an evening of musical pomp and grandeur’.

The trumpeters are followed by a welcome from the Household Division’s Senior Director of Music, Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Roberts, and an introduction to compere, Alasdair Hutton, best known for his many years presenting the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo. This warm, genial Scotsman, dressed from head to toe in tartan, is the perfect host, introducing an impressive array of ensembles, conductors and soloists over the next two hours.

The ensembles range from the small (the Household Division Saxophone Quartet) to the large (the Countess of Wessex’s String Orchestra). Conductors are drawn from across the Bands of the Household Division while soloists include winner of the 2017 Household Division’s Young Musician of the Year Competition, Stephen Shepherd (saxophone), Royal Welsh College of Music and Drama graduate, Corporal James Sandalls (violin), and Honourable Artillery Company Band reservist, Ben Godfrey (trumpet).

What is particularly exciting about this eclectic musical evening is the range of styles covered – from traditional brass band music to Latin American, from sacred music to jazz, from classical music to specially commissioned new music like Nigel Hess’s New London Suite, performed to a film depicting the hustle and bustle of the capital. According to the programme, ‘this tapestry of London life starts with Millennium Bridge, a pedestrian’s journey across the newest bridge over the River Thames, followed by London Eye which depicts a flight on the riverside wheel and the panoramic views it affords. It concludes with Congestion Charge with its oom-pa-pas, whistles and jeering from the clarinets capturing the stressful attempt of Londoners to go about their business in the face of overwhelming odds.’

What’s also exciting is how well rehearsed and polished the performances are and with what precision they are delivered. Which is not to say that the concert lacks heart. On the contrary, the humanity of each player is evident. From small touches like the choreographed introductions to certain pieces (two players brought the house down with their po-faced pacing to some rather sombre music) to the evident respect afforded by the players to their conductors, there is a sense that these musicians take great pride in their work.

Here’s Major General Ben Bathurst again: ‘The Army is all about talented individuals working as a team and, as a result, the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Being in a military band is exactly that, each musician playing their part and being able to depend on each other to do the same. The result is absolute commitment and performance to the highest of standards.’

Which brings us back to the start – careers. Perhaps it’s best to leave you with the words of Lieutenant Colonel Kevin Roberts – again, in the programme: ‘To lead State Ceremonial music has been the highlight of my career and the greatest honour of my life. Throughout my long career within the Army, I have been afforded the greatest opportunities to develop professionally and to perform on the world stage at events that, as a young musician, were beyond my wildest dreams. The musicians you see tonight are the most dedicated, talented and passionate men and women I have had the honour to work with and I consider myself hugely fortunate to conduct them and to work alongside them on a daily basis.’

We head off into the cold, happy to spread the word.

Scarlet & Gold ran from 6-7 December 2017 at Cadogan Hall.

Key information

  • Title: Dorico
  • What it is: Scoring software
  • Developer: Steinberg
  • Price information: Dorico Retail – (boxed) £497, (download) £480 / Dorico Retail crossgrade from Sibelius or Finale – (boxed) £257, (download) £239 / Dorico Education – (boxed) £300, (download) £282 / Dorico Education crossgrade from Sibelius or Finale – (boxed) £153, (download) £136
  • Available from: https://www.steinberg.net / https://www.dorico.com or music shops

Dr Steven Berryman road-tests Steinberg’s new score-writing software

The background to Steinberg’s Dorico – a new notation software to join the likes of Sibelius and Finale – has been told well in previous reviews and music educators might be interested in new software but might have plenty of scepticism towards it too.

Investing in music technology equipment and software is an expensive venture – it needs regular updates and quickly dates. I was keen to see if Dorico offered something that might tackle the frustrations that users have with other programs in addition to matching the well-used interfaces of software such as Sibelius and Finale. I have used Sibelius since the beginning and, while I was not particularly sceptical, I knew it would be a steep learning curve approaching new notation software after so many years of using Sibelius. I went in with an open mind and, thankfully, Daniel Spreadbury at Steinberg (@dspreadbury) was able to give me an introduction to the software at Steinberg’s offices in London.

Bringing it all together

To those of you familiar with Cubase, Dorico was built to make use of Cubase’s audio engine, meaning Dorico has access to the same VSTs and the various procession tools (amp modelling and synths for example). This is good news for those schools or users that might have Cubase already as now you can have the notation editor that can give you a superior result to the inbuilt notation editing facilities of Cubase.

A more intuitive approach to writing

One thing I always found frustrating with other notation software was that you needed to obey the rules of music theory from the outset. In some respects, I needed to know what I wanted to write in Sibelius before I entered it as changing musical details (note lengths particularly) would necessitate bigger changes. For students in the classroom, particularly at GCSE and beyond, I would often see a plague of common time: students entered their compositions without thought to metre but their music would be in common time (4/4) by default. Discovering that they meant their composition to be in triple time meant a hefty rewrite. This is in no way a significant criticism of Sibelius but a flaw in a software as a composing tool. You are not free to express yourself devoid of the rules of music theory. Dorico provides a flexibility I personally always wanted in Sibelius and an approach I use in my own composing: not quite knowing the metre required but writing free of bar-lines and adding in these details once the musical ideas become longer. What surprises you upon using Dorico for the first time is that you can enter notes and the ‘bar’ keeps growing to accommodate. I can add in details such as time signatures later and even change the note values without disrupting the material and necessitating significant rewriting. Daniel called these ‘non-destructive edits’ and you are pleasantly surprised by the automatic re-notation of the material as a result of any edits.

Starting the writing process

Starting the writing process

I missed the ability to move the notes around with the cursor keys as I would in Sibelius when I clicked in the wrong note. I did enjoy being able to add a bar line where I wanted, free of any considerations about my metre. Being able to add the metre later is a real joy and being able to change it and have Dorico re-notate your music correctly in the new metre is a dream. Dorico separates the process of ‘writing’ and ‘engraving’ and it is good that you can save the necessary tweaks to a separate part of the process. I think this is a clear message to students of the work process: set up your score, write your music, ‘engrave’ your music, play it and then print it. As Daniel put it, Dorico looks to ‘stretch what a scoring programme can be: out of your brain into the software’.

I can add barlines where I like, free of metre

I can add barlines where I like, free of metre

I can choose the time signatures after the notes

I can choose the time signatures after the notes

Spacing and parts

Music teachers are endlessly producing arrangements and parts for classes and ensembles and the quality and ease of producing these will be a significant concern to those working with groups. I wanted to see how Dorico would fare with scores I have already produced in Sibelius so I exported these via XML. I opened up a Bach Chorale exercise from a student and this appeared without any error and the look of the score is very pleasing. Extracting parts was easy and the look is excellent and print-ready without much editing needed – though I am looking at very straightforward material.

There are plenty of options to adjust the look of the score

There are plenty of options to adjust the look of the score

Music frames and the potential for handouts

I am probably not alone in trying to create worksheets and handouts for students that feature musical examples lovingly engraved and I have grown fond of the ability to export graphics from Sibelius and be able to insert these examples into documents. Daniel introduced me to ‘music frames’ and the possibilities are quite exciting. An ingenious way of creating a worksheet or handout directly in Dorico without the need of exporting material but also a way of replicating the various instances where you might need a small additional staff on a score (for example, if you are putting the plainsong at the start of a choral work or a small example at the bottom of a score for how an ornament might be realised) or other occasions when you might need to add additional musical details without conflicting with other material. I would need even more time to explore this feature but, already, I can see some quick ways to devise handouts suitable for teaching in a variety of contexts from school to university. Being able to create frames that can be altered in size and remain as editable music and not a fixed graphic is thrilling.

I can add additional music frames without conflict with other material

I can add additional music frames without conflict with other material

Summary

Having spent over two decades working with Sibelius and being at the stage where I felt I would not need to look for an alternative software and trying something new and learning the various shortcuts and processes would be daunting, I was pleasantly surprised by Dorico. Of course, it is different but some shortcuts were similar and I was able to discover various processes through exploring. Also, by looking at the impressive YouTube channel, you can discover more about the software and learn in a relatively short space of time how to get started. It might not have a lavish printed manual but having instructional videos is incredibly handy, particularly if you are in a class context and want students to be able to learn various features of the software independently. I recommend taking a look at Dorico – you will be surprised by the intuitive nature of the ‘write’ process and will discover some possibilities that other software has not been able to do with such ease. The Dorico journey is not quite over yet and you might find some features that do not match the likes of Sibelius but, given time, I sense we are going to have an impressive software that is going to allow greater freedom in the composing process not only for those in schools but also those working professionally. Steinberg shows a great deal of energy and support for those working in education and I welcome this as a school teacher. We often pick up our music technology skills on the job and knowing there is a good support network and a dedicated education officer who you can contact for advice is fantastic.


About the author

Dr Steven Berryman is Director of Music at City of London School for Girls and a Visiting Research Fellow in the School of Education, Communication & Society at King’s College London (2017-2019).

He previously taught at the North London Collegiate School and the Junior Academy of the Royal Academy of Music. Steven has examined and moderated for GCSE and A Level Music and contributed composition chapters to two study guides for Rhinegold Education and a chapter for an edited volume from Routledge (2016). He has been a Teach Through Music Fellow and a Teacher Advocate for Music Excellence London in addition to education projects with the Learning Departments of the Royal Opera House, London Philharmonic Orchestra and NMC Recordings.

Steven studied composition at Royal Holloway, University of London, and Cardiff University, gaining a PhD in 2010. Cypher (2010) was selected by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales for performance in their Welsh Composers Showcase and was performed by the orchestra in 2011, conducted by Jan Van Steen at BBC Hoddinott Hall, Cardiff Bay. In 2011, North London Collegiate staged Steven’s musical theatre work for a cast of over fifty girls, Juniper Dreams. Opera Holland Park commissioned Steven to transcribe arias by Donizetti for a dance performance, Dance Holland Park, in June 2012 and, the same year, he worked on music for two plays: Jamie Zubairi’s one-man show, Unbroken Line (Ovalhouse, December 2012), and Corpo: Lixa da Alma (Cena Internacional Brasil, Rio de Janerio, June 2012). Versa est in Luctum was performed in Washington DC in January 2013 as part of the New Voices @ CUA Festival and, in September 2016, LSO Community Choir and students from City of London School for Girls performed Steven’s O Come Let Us Sing as part of Old Street New Beginnings, celebrating fifty years since the joining of the St Luke’s and St Giles’ parishes.

Steven is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Art and a Freeman of both The Musicians’ Company and the Worshipful Company of Educators.

Website: www.steven-berryman.com
Email: info@steven-berryman.com


 

Sing Up Song Bank

+44 (0)20 7908 5148

Sing Up

Annual subscriptions: £60 (individual), £210 (school). Quoted prices exclude VAT.

About Sing Up membership

Sing Up membership provides access to the Sing Up Song Bank, with hundreds of specially arranged songs, teaching tools and supporting resources for all your singing needs, in and out of school.

The Sing Up Song Bank

  • Expertly arranged songs and warm ups to support young voices as they develop
  • Display songs by Age, Subject, Style, Music Topic, SEN and more: for easy searching!
  • Plus teaching notes and scores to help you teach songs well

Membership benefits

  • Song Bank credits
    Use your credits to take Sing Up songs offline and print out the sheet music
  • Unlimited plays of all songs
    Stream our collection online
  • Teaching resources, including song teaching notes, music projects, cross-curricular activity plans and assembly plans
    Use our resources to help achieve your learning objectives
  • A range of video content and tutorials
  • Logins for your whole staff team
NEW Learn a fun mambo as a class

Learn a fun mambo as a class

Sing Up & Drums for Schools

Shelley Ambury & Andy Gleadhill

Shelly Ambury from Sing Up and Andy Gleadhill from Drums for Schools explain how to create a group performance with help from Sing Up and Drums for Schools.

What your pupils will learn

  • Improved awareness of pulse (keeping a steady beat), pitch (echo singing), rhythm (layering rhythmic patterns over a pulse) and structure (call-and-response patterns)
  • Motor skills and instrument handling l Singing (tuning, expression, diction)
  • Listening and ensemble skills (maintaining a part within a group)

Click below to download the PDF

Learn a fun mambo as a class

Learn a fun mambo as a class


Links

singup.org  |  drumsforschools.com
@singuptweets  |  @drumsforschools

MUSIC-ED

Classical 100

+44 (0)20 7636 5400

ABRSM

Classical 100 is a free resource for primary schools in the UK that’ll ignite enthusiasm for classical music in your classroom.  

Classical 100 features 100 pieces of classical music in a dynamic list, ranging from Bach to Bernstein and Handel to Haydn. You can sort the music by mood, instrument, tempo and historical period, or in any other way that suits you.

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