I Speak Music

I Speak Music is a project bringing together professionals and community groups who work with newly arrived and vulnerable young people through music.

Between April and December 2018, a team of talented and enthusiastic professional musicians and supporters will work with these young people (who might be young asylum seekers, young refugees or young people who have been trafficked to UK). They will provide a number of taster sessions, song writing and music workshops during the school holidays, a time when young people can feel the most isolated and vulnerable, and will together share the fruits of their experience at a celebration concert for friends, family and supporters.

The activities will provide a safe and supportive environment for expression, creativity and musical skills, as well as practical tools such as relaxation through breathing and rhythm exercises. Sessions will focus on exploring shared identities to serve as a catalyst to create new music together. They will be able to make new friends, relax and have fun while making music – their music. Instruments are provided – western classical, rock and those sourced from participants’ region of birth.

Tutors, supporters and project partners will also grow through this experience, as they are equal players. They will gain a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence through engaging with them. Planning and awareness training sessions will be provided for all staff working on the project, and each music session will end with dedicated time for the music team to reflect and evaluate the session.

The project believes that by participating in ‘I Speak Music’, the budding young musicians will grow in self-confidence as well as improving their musical skills and increasing their life opportunities.

Specifically and longer term the project hopes that the young people who take part will be inspired to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups. This will mean that they will continue to develop what they have learnt and explore other music genres after the project ends.

 

 

 

 

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  • To bring together professionals and community groups who work with, or have an interest in supporting newly arrived and vulnerable young people through the arts and music.
  • To deliver song writing taster workshops, music workshops, and a celebration concert of participants’ experience.
  • To develop the musical skills and build the self-confidence of the young musicians.
  • To allow tutors, supporters and project partners to also grow through this experience by gaining a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence in engaging with them.
  • To inspire participants to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups.
  • To continue to develop what they have learned and explore music genres after the project ends.

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  • “When I came to this country it was a bit strange to me, it didn’t feel very comfortable to be in a new place, new language and meeting new people, going back to square one. Meeting people like Jim [Pinchen, project manager] made such a difference in my life – I think everyone feels the same when they come and take part in this project. They feel welcome and feel like they can play a part” – Rajhad Haddad, violist, I Speak Music Community Orchestra
  • “What I love about it is the diversity of the group and the fact that, whenever we have a rehearsal, everyone comes not quite knowing what’s going to happen, not quite confident, slightly insecure, and some of them come from quite a solitary place. By the end of the rehearsal the energy of the music has really solidified everyone together – it’s a beautiful energetic experience.” – Sara Khoroosi, freelance musician, Surrey Arts worker

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Youth Music

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Greater Manchester Music Hub Ensembles/Chetham’s School of Music

Manchester, United Kingdom

  • Greater Manchester Music Hub
  • Manchester Music Hub

North-West England

I Speak Music is a project bringing together professionals and community groups who work with newly arrived and vulnerable young people through music.

Between April and December 2018, a team of talented and enthusiastic professional musicians and supporters will work with these young people (who might be young asylum seekers, young refugees or young people who have been trafficked to UK). They will provide a number of taster sessions, song writing and music workshops during the school holidays, a time when young people can feel the most isolated and vulnerable, and will together share the fruits of their experience at a celebration concert for friends, family and supporters.

The activities will provide a safe and supportive environment for expression, creativity and musical skills, as well as practical tools such as relaxation through breathing and rhythm exercises. Sessions will focus on exploring shared identities to serve as a catalyst to create new music together. They will be able to make new friends, relax and have fun while making music – their music. Instruments are provided – western classical, rock and those sourced from participants’ region of birth.

Tutors, supporters and project partners will also grow through this experience, as they are equal players. They will gain a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence through engaging with them. Planning and awareness training sessions will be provided for all staff working on the project, and each music session will end with dedicated time for the music team to reflect and evaluate the session.

The project believes that by participating in ‘I Speak Music’, the budding young musicians will grow in self-confidence as well as improving their musical skills and increasing their life opportunities.

Specifically and longer term the project hopes that the young people who take part will be inspired to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups. This will mean that they will continue to develop what they have learnt and explore other music genres after the project ends.

 

 

 

 

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Girls Rock London

London, United Kingdom

  • Arts Council England
  • Bell Music
  • Fender
  • WeDriveYou
  • National Foundation for Youth Music
  • Novation

 

'Girls Rock: the all-female music camp taking a stand against sexism' - The Guardian

'Feature: Girls Rock London' - The Girls Are

'A rock school is opening in London' - Dazed

'Women Rock London announce all-female summer camp' - Crack

Girls Rock London: Challenging the under-representation of women in music head on, by increasing opportunity and boosting self esteem - Sound Connections

 

  • To date, Girls Rock London has run four successful rock camps, where it has seen real impact in terms of continued music-making, and increased self-esteem and confidence levels of participants.
  • Participant surveys measure self-esteem, confidence, resilience and body image before and after the camp. At the 2017 camp, there was a 13% overall rise in scores across the group, and a 46% change in specific areas including improved body image.
  • Participants reported leaving with new friendships and a positive experience of working with people from different backgrounds to their own.

  • 'I came to camp thinking I was going to learn more about an instrument; what I really learned was how much potential I had as a musician and how it increased through collaboration.' (participant)
  • 'It was the most exhilarating and inspiring weekend of my life. I never want this feeling to end. I just want to keep creating and performing music.' (participant)
  • 'I have struggled to find the words to express how grateful and inspired I am by the Girls Rock London team and how much the experience meant to me. If I was an economist I’d lay out the investment and return as unparalleled. I have never been in an environment as supportive, encouraging and uplifting as that at GRL. I think I’ve learnt more about music and creativity than any music or art class in the formal education system. Every member of the team blew me away with their approachability, friendliness, knowledge and skill, encouragement and guidance. (participant)
  • I have seen first-hand the lasting impact that positive encouragement can have on people and how, with enough determination and teamwork, we can create the change we want to see in the world. Thank you, GRL! (volunteer)

  • To improve the confidence and self-esteem of young women and girls. One in four girls aged 14 is depressed, and twice as many 14 and 15 year old girls than boys are unhappy with their appearance. Hospital admissions because of self-harm among girls has risen by 68% in the past decade.
  • To increase the number of women and girls making music. Over the past decade, a reported 95% of Reading and Leeds festival line-ups have been dominated by male acts. 

 

London

I Speak Music is a project bringing together professionals and community groups who work with newly arrived and vulnerable young people through music.

Between April and December 2018, a team of talented and enthusiastic professional musicians and supporters will work with these young people (who might be young asylum seekers, young refugees or young people who have been trafficked to UK). They will provide a number of taster sessions, song writing and music workshops during the school holidays, a time when young people can feel the most isolated and vulnerable, and will together share the fruits of their experience at a celebration concert for friends, family and supporters.

The activities will provide a safe and supportive environment for expression, creativity and musical skills, as well as practical tools such as relaxation through breathing and rhythm exercises. Sessions will focus on exploring shared identities to serve as a catalyst to create new music together. They will be able to make new friends, relax and have fun while making music – their music. Instruments are provided – western classical, rock and those sourced from participants’ region of birth.

Tutors, supporters and project partners will also grow through this experience, as they are equal players. They will gain a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence through engaging with them. Planning and awareness training sessions will be provided for all staff working on the project, and each music session will end with dedicated time for the music team to reflect and evaluate the session.

The project believes that by participating in ‘I Speak Music’, the budding young musicians will grow in self-confidence as well as improving their musical skills and increasing their life opportunities.

Specifically and longer term the project hopes that the young people who take part will be inspired to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups. This will mean that they will continue to develop what they have learnt and explore other music genres after the project ends.

 

 

 

 

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Sistema England

England, United Kingdom

  • Sistema England comprises 3,300 musicians aged 0-18 from more than 80 schools.
  • Globally, Sistema-inspired programmes serve an estimated one million people in at least sixty countries. 
  • Between October 2015 and August 2016, the Sistema England Young Leaders membership grew from 35 to 60 musicians.
  • Upwards of 2,000 young musicians and music tutors were able to participate in SMEEC in 2015 thanks to a €200,000 matched funding provision by the EU Culture Programme.

 

  • 'The energy and the vibe that we get off each other during the camp just energises us and motivates us to keep going, no matter what the challenges are. That’s what’s great about Sistema England.' Simi, Cellist, In Harmony Lambeth, Sistema England Young Leader
  • 'The summer camp was an amazing experience for all our new and current Young Leaders. Throughout the week the kids were able to go beyond the normal expectations of them.' Teacher
  • 'I flew to Sweden with ten children – somehow I managed to lose them all! Luckily, the parents of those children seemed thrilled that I brought back ten mature, responsible and inspired young adults in their place! How is it possible for a group of children to become confident, empowered, broad minded and musically progressed in just one week? El Sistema… Achieving huge things alongside new friends, being given the space to make the right decisions and not be held back by the usual restraints in their day to day lives.' Steve Copley, Music Director, Sistema in Norwich

Sistema England aims within five years to be a recognised leader in the global 'music for change' field through enabling both high 'Musical Return on Investment' and high Social Return on Investment (SROI) for children and young people. Its aims are:

  • To empower children and young people to become agents of their futures and global citizens
  • To enable children and young people to make great music and art together
  • To increase the workforce of engaging and effective teaching artists
  • To strengthen the community of 'music change makers' to spread best practices

I Speak Music is a project bringing together professionals and community groups who work with newly arrived and vulnerable young people through music.

Between April and December 2018, a team of talented and enthusiastic professional musicians and supporters will work with these young people (who might be young asylum seekers, young refugees or young people who have been trafficked to UK). They will provide a number of taster sessions, song writing and music workshops during the school holidays, a time when young people can feel the most isolated and vulnerable, and will together share the fruits of their experience at a celebration concert for friends, family and supporters.

The activities will provide a safe and supportive environment for expression, creativity and musical skills, as well as practical tools such as relaxation through breathing and rhythm exercises. Sessions will focus on exploring shared identities to serve as a catalyst to create new music together. They will be able to make new friends, relax and have fun while making music – their music. Instruments are provided – western classical, rock and those sourced from participants’ region of birth.

Tutors, supporters and project partners will also grow through this experience, as they are equal players. They will gain a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence through engaging with them. Planning and awareness training sessions will be provided for all staff working on the project, and each music session will end with dedicated time for the music team to reflect and evaluate the session.

The project believes that by participating in ‘I Speak Music’, the budding young musicians will grow in self-confidence as well as improving their musical skills and increasing their life opportunities.

Specifically and longer term the project hopes that the young people who take part will be inspired to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups. This will mean that they will continue to develop what they have learnt and explore other music genres after the project ends.

 

 

 

 

Posted In  AdvocacyEducation and  Outreach