Performance

Greater Manchester Music Hub Ensembles, opening weekend at Stoller Hall, Manchester

Greater Manchester Music Hub Ensembles/Chetham’s School of Music

Manchester, United Kingdom

  • Greater Manchester Music Hub
  • Manchester Music Hub

North-West England

Chetham’s School of Music is a partner in both Manchester and Greater Manchester Music Education Hubs.

We’re delighted that the Greater Manchester Youth Jazz and String Orchestras hold their regular rehearsal weekends here at Chetham’s, and have done so since their inception. Chetham’s New School Building provides a fantastic base for the ensembles to meet and rehearse, and for our students and staff to work alongside young musicians from the wider region.

A number of Chetham’s students are also members of the Jazz Orchestra, whilst Director of Music, Stephen Threlfall, and Deputy Head of Strings, Owen Cox, are both involved in conducting and tutoring the String Orchestra. This partnership has arisen from a strong relationship with the Greater Manchester Music Education Hub, and has given both ensembles new opportunities to explore new repertoire and to prepare for performances at high profile Hub celebrations.

MUSIC:ED

Friday Afternoons

Aldeburgh

  • Arts Council England
  • The Boltini Trust
  • The Garfield Weston Foundation
  • The Sackler Trust
  • The Doric Charitable Trust

  • To encourage young people to sing;
  • To build a Song Bank and support material to help teachers develop their students' skills as performers, listeners and composers.

East of England

Inspired by Benjamin Britten, Friday Afternoons is an international initiative encouraging young people to sing.

Our ever-growing Song Bank contains new music and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills – as performers, listeners and composers.

The Friday Afternoons initiative began in 2013 as part of the celebrations for Benjamin Britten’s centenary. What was initially just a Suffolk project became regional, then national, then global, and on Friday, 22 November 2013, there were close to 70,000 young people from around the world singing one or more of Britten’s songs.

Friday Afternoons now commissions new repertoire every year for children’s voices, with a whole host of resources available for free on the website, including teaching and accessibility resources to help as many people as possible engage with the songs.

For 2017, Luke Styles has been working alongside librettist Alan McKendrick on 12 new songs for the Friday Afternoons Song Bank. Eight of the songs have been written by the composer and librettist, with four additional songs being created in collaboration with groups of young people across the country. These groups are: Elgol Primary School and Bun-sgoil Shlèite, Isle of Skye; Thomas Wolsey School, Ipswich; Netley Primary School, London; and students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

'Lullaby' concert in CLS's Growth through Music programme © Paul Coghlin

Meet the Music

Piano House, Brighton Terrace, London SW9, United Kingdom

  • Bethlem and Maudsley Hospital School

  • Breathe Arts Health Research

  • The Christopher Rowbotham Charitable Trust
  • The Douglas Heath Eves Charitable Trust
  • The Dunhill Medical Trust

  • Evelina Hospital School

  • The February Foundation
  • Great Ormond Street Hospital School

  • Harrow Music Education Hub

  • Headway East London

  • The Human Trafficking Foundation
  • Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (King's College London)

  • Jewish Care

  • MariaMarina Foundation
  • Orchestras Live

  • Queen Mary University of London

  • The Richard Hickox Foundation
  • Royal Hospital for Neurodisability

  • St Joseph’s Hospice

  • Task Force Trust
  • Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES)

  • University College London Hospital School

  • "Some of the kids had never publicly performed before. It was a real milestone for their confidence. To be given the opportunity was just fantastic." Julia Schubert, Westgate Youth Group, Ipswich

 

  • To work in care homes, hospitals and hospices, honing the necessary skills to allow music to aid in the healing process and provide an outlet for those who need it most.
  • To work alongside local music hubs to deliver unique creative projects and first-time orchestral experiences with young people who have significantly lower levels of arts engagement.
  • To address the economic and cultural barriers that may prevent young people from discovering classical music, workshop participants work directly with our musicians to programme and produce a range of exciting and inspiring concerts.

City of London Sinfonia‘s Meet the Music programme spends over 170 days a year in the community making music with 14,000+ people.

Current Meet the Music projects include:

  • Wellbeing through Music. This takes place in healthcare settings, where City of London Sinfonia (CLS) musicians deliver performances, often at patients’ bedsides, as well as end-of-term projects for young children in major London teaching hospitals such as Great Ormond Street. They also undertake regular visits to care homes in North London, making music with Holocaust survivors or people suffering from dementia. Plans for the next three years include creating a body of research around the effectiveness of these projects, going beyond the anecdotal and providing clinical evidence as to their effectiveness.
  • Growth through Music. This sees CLS musicians working with very young children (aged 3-7) in communities that are geographically or economically isolated, including rural Suffolk and Tower Hamlets. Working closely with schools and music education hubs, CLS addresses a significant gap in provision for children at a crucial time in their academic and social development, performing for children and families through its Crash Bang Wallop! and Lullaby concert series and creating interactive first-time orchestral experiences for teenagers and young people through its First Time Live projects in collaboration with Orchestras Live.

Header photo: Lullaby concert in CLS’s Growth through Music programme © Paul Coghlin