Outreach

Greater Manchester Music Hub Ensembles, opening weekend at Stoller Hall, Manchester

Greater Manchester Music Hub Ensembles/Chetham’s School of Music

Manchester, United Kingdom

  • Greater Manchester Music Hub
  • Manchester Music Hub

North-West England

Chetham’s School of Music is a partner in both Manchester and Greater Manchester Music Education Hubs.

We’re delighted that the Greater Manchester Youth Jazz and String Orchestras hold their regular rehearsal weekends here at Chetham’s, and have done so since their inception. Chetham’s New School Building provides a fantastic base for the ensembles to meet and rehearse, and for our students and staff to work alongside young musicians from the wider region.

A number of Chetham’s students are also members of the Jazz Orchestra, whilst Director of Music, Stephen Threlfall, and Deputy Head of Strings, Owen Cox, are both involved in conducting and tutoring the String Orchestra. This partnership has arisen from a strong relationship with the Greater Manchester Music Education Hub, and has given both ensembles new opportunities to explore new repertoire and to prepare for performances at high profile Hub celebrations.

The I Speak Music project

I Speak Music

Surrey Music Hub, Westfield Primary School, Bonsey Lane, Kingfield, Woking GU22 9PR, UK

Youth Music

  • To bring together professionals and community groups who work with, or have an interest in supporting newly arrived and vulnerable young people through the arts and music.
  • To deliver song writing taster workshops, music workshops, and a celebration concert of participants' experience.
  • To develop the musical skills and build the self-confidence of the young musicians.
  • To allow tutors, supporters and project partners to also grow through this experience by gaining a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence in engaging with them.
  • To inspire participants to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups.
  • To continue to develop what they have learned and explore music genres after the project ends.

South-East England

2018-12-24

2018-04-02

I Speak Music is a new project funded by Youth Music, aiming to bring together professionals and community groups who work with, or have an interest in, supporting newly arrived and vulnerable young people (for example: young asylum seekers, young refugees, young people who have been trafficked to UK) through the arts and music.

Between April and December 2018, a team of talented and enthusiastic professional musicians and supporters will work with these young people and deliver a number of workshops, the results of which will be showcased in a celebration concert in December.

 

 

Music Education UK

SCO Reconnect

Edinburgh, UK

SCO ReConnect is a programme of interactive, creative music workshops for people living with dementia.

This project provides a series of music sessions in which patients are invited and supported to sing, play instruments, improvise and listen. Sessions are delivered by a specialist workshop leader and two SCO musicians and involve dementia patients, visiting family members and NHS staff.

Girls Rock London

London, United Kingdom

  • Arts Council England
  • Bell Music
  • Fender
  • WeDriveYou
  • National Foundation for Youth Music
  • Novation

 

The Guardian: 'the eagerness of former campers to return as volunteers shows that the camps are doing their job building confidence in the next generation.'

The Girls Are: 'Making future rock stars of the capital’s girls at the same time as building their confidence, the initiative looks set to land soon in a county near you, and is gaining support from some high-profile figures.'

Dazed

Crack

Sound Connections

 

  • To date, Girls Rock London has run four successful rock camps, where it has seen real impact in terms of continued music-making, and increased self-esteem and confidence levels of participants.
  • Participant surveys measure self-esteem, confidence, resilience and body image before and after the camp. At the 2017 camp, there was a 13% overall rise in scores across the group, and a 46% change in specific areas including improved body image.
  • Participants reported leaving with new friendships and a positive experience of working with people from different backgrounds to their own.

  • 'I came to camp thinking I was going to learn more about an instrument; what I really learned was how much potential I had as a musician and how it increased through collaboration.'
  • 'It was the most exhilarating and inspiring weekend of my life. I never want this feeling to end. I just want to keep creating and performing music.'
  • 'I have struggled to find the words to express how grateful and inspired I am by the Girls Rock London team and how much the experience meant to me. If I was an economist I’d lay out the investment and return as unparalleled. I have never been in an environment as supportive, encouraging and uplifting as that at GRL. I think I’ve learnt more about music and creativity than any music or art class in the formal education system. Every member of the team blew me away with their approachability, friendliness, knowledge and skill, encouragement and guidance.'

  • To improve the confidence and self-esteem of young women and girls. One in four girls aged 14 is depressed, and twice as many 14 and 15 year old girls than boys are unhappy with their appearance. Hospital admissions because of self-harm among girls has risen by 68% in the past decade.
  • To increase the number of women and girls making music. Over the past decade, a reported 95% of Reading and Leeds festival line-ups have been dominated by male acts. 

 

London

Girls Rock London (GRL!) is a music project for girls and women in London.

GRL is part of a movement of rock camps that take place all over the world, united by a desire to achieve gender equality in the music industry and to ensure that all girls and women get the chance to make music. The aims of the project are to empower girls and women – regardless of previous musical experience – to write and perform music, and to build self-confidence.

The programme is a mixture of musical/technical tuition and workshops, which together help to build participants’ self-esteem and confidence, and provide a platform for girls and women to find and develop their voices. Rock Camp is all about trying new things, working together and making lots of NOISE…
'Lullaby' concert in CLS's Growth through Music programme © Paul Coghlin

Meet the Music

Piano House, Brighton Terrace, London SW9, United Kingdom

  • Bethlem and Maudsley Hospital School

  • Breathe Arts Health Research

  • The Christopher Rowbotham Charitable Trust
  • The Douglas Heath Eves Charitable Trust
  • The Dunhill Medical Trust

  • Evelina Hospital School

  • The February Foundation
  • Great Ormond Street Hospital School

  • Harrow Music Education Hub

  • Headway East London

  • The Human Trafficking Foundation
  • Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (King's College London)

  • Jewish Care

  • MariaMarina Foundation
  • Orchestras Live

  • Queen Mary University of London

  • The Richard Hickox Foundation
  • Royal Hospital for Neurodisability

  • St Joseph’s Hospice

  • Task Force Trust
  • Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES)

  • University College London Hospital School

  • "Some of the kids had never publicly performed before. It was a real milestone for their confidence. To be given the opportunity was just fantastic." Julia Schubert, Westgate Youth Group, Ipswich

 

  • To work in care homes, hospitals and hospices, honing the necessary skills to allow music to aid in the healing process and provide an outlet for those who need it most.
  • To work alongside local music hubs to deliver unique creative projects and first-time orchestral experiences with young people who have significantly lower levels of arts engagement.
  • To address the economic and cultural barriers that may prevent young people from discovering classical music, workshop participants work directly with our musicians to programme and produce a range of exciting and inspiring concerts.

City of London Sinfonia‘s Meet the Music programme spends over 170 days a year in the community making music with 14,000+ people.

Current Meet the Music projects include:

  • Wellbeing through Music. This takes place in healthcare settings, where City of London Sinfonia (CLS) musicians deliver performances, often at patients’ bedsides, as well as end-of-term projects for young children in major London teaching hospitals such as Great Ormond Street. They also undertake regular visits to care homes in North London, making music with Holocaust survivors or people suffering from dementia. Plans for the next three years include creating a body of research around the effectiveness of these projects, going beyond the anecdotal and providing clinical evidence as to their effectiveness.
  • Growth through Music. This sees CLS musicians working with very young children (aged 3-7) in communities that are geographically or economically isolated, including rural Suffolk and Tower Hamlets. Working closely with schools and music education hubs, CLS addresses a significant gap in provision for children at a crucial time in their academic and social development, performing for children and families through its Crash Bang Wallop! and Lullaby concert series and creating interactive first-time orchestral experiences for teenagers and young people through its First Time Live projects in collaboration with Orchestras Live.

Header photo: Lullaby concert in CLS’s Growth through Music programme © Paul Coghlin