MUSIC:ED

Friday Afternoons

Aldeburgh

  • Arts Council England
  • The Boltini Trust
  • The Garfield Weston Foundation
  • The Sackler Trust
  • The Doric Charitable Trust

  • To encourage young people to sing;
  • To build a Song Bank and support material to help teachers develop their students' skills as performers, listeners and composers.

East of England

Inspired by Benjamin Britten, Friday Afternoons is an international initiative encouraging young people to sing.

Our ever-growing Song Bank contains new music and support material to help teachers develop their students’ skills – as performers, listeners and composers.

The Friday Afternoons initiative began in 2013 as part of the celebrations for Benjamin Britten’s centenary. What was initially just a Suffolk project became regional, then national, then global, and on Friday, 22 November 2013, there were close to 70,000 young people from around the world singing one or more of Britten’s songs.

Friday Afternoons now commissions new repertoire every year for children’s voices, with a whole host of resources available for free on the website, including teaching and accessibility resources to help as many people as possible engage with the songs.

For 2017, Luke Styles has been working alongside librettist Alan McKendrick on 12 new songs for the Friday Afternoons Song Bank. Eight of the songs have been written by the composer and librettist, with four additional songs being created in collaboration with groups of young people across the country. These groups are: Elgol Primary School and Bun-sgoil Shlèite, Isle of Skye; Thomas Wolsey School, Ipswich; Netley Primary School, London; and students from Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.

The I Speak Music project

I Speak Music

Surrey Music Hub, Westfield Primary School, Bonsey Lane, Kingfield, Woking GU22 9PR, UK

Youth Music

  • To bring together professionals and community groups who work with, or have an interest in supporting newly arrived and vulnerable young people through the arts and music.
  • To deliver song writing taster workshops, music workshops, and a celebration concert of participants' experience.
  • To develop the musical skills and build the self-confidence of the young musicians.
  • To allow tutors, supporters and project partners to also grow through this experience by gaining a better understanding of the challenges these young people face and grow in confidence in engaging with them.
  • To inspire participants to join and progress onto other Surrey Arts ensembles and groups.
  • To continue to develop what they have learned and explore music genres after the project ends.

South-East England

2018-12-24

2018-04-02

I Speak Music is a new project funded by Youth Music, aiming to bring together professionals and community groups who work with, or have an interest in, supporting newly arrived and vulnerable young people (for example: young asylum seekers, young refugees, young people who have been trafficked to UK) through the arts and music.

Between April and December 2018, a team of talented and enthusiastic professional musicians and supporters will work with these young people and deliver a number of workshops, the results of which will be showcased in a celebration concert in December.

 

 

Girls Rock London

London, United Kingdom

  • Arts Council England
  • Bell Music
  • Fender
  • WeDriveYou
  • National Foundation for Youth Music
  • Novation

 

The Guardian: 'the eagerness of former campers to return as volunteers shows that the camps are doing their job building confidence in the next generation.'

The Girls Are: 'Making future rock stars of the capital’s girls at the same time as building their confidence, the initiative looks set to land soon in a county near you, and is gaining support from some high-profile figures.'

Dazed

Crack

Sound Connections

 

  • To date, Girls Rock London has run four successful rock camps, where it has seen real impact in terms of continued music-making, and increased self-esteem and confidence levels of participants.
  • Participant surveys measure self-esteem, confidence, resilience and body image before and after the camp. At the 2017 camp, there was a 13% overall rise in scores across the group, and a 46% change in specific areas including improved body image.
  • Participants reported leaving with new friendships and a positive experience of working with people from different backgrounds to their own.

  • 'I came to camp thinking I was going to learn more about an instrument; what I really learned was how much potential I had as a musician and how it increased through collaboration.'
  • 'It was the most exhilarating and inspiring weekend of my life. I never want this feeling to end. I just want to keep creating and performing music.'
  • 'I have struggled to find the words to express how grateful and inspired I am by the Girls Rock London team and how much the experience meant to me. If I was an economist I’d lay out the investment and return as unparalleled. I have never been in an environment as supportive, encouraging and uplifting as that at GRL. I think I’ve learnt more about music and creativity than any music or art class in the formal education system. Every member of the team blew me away with their approachability, friendliness, knowledge and skill, encouragement and guidance.'

  • To improve the confidence and self-esteem of young women and girls. One in four girls aged 14 is depressed, and twice as many 14 and 15 year old girls than boys are unhappy with their appearance. Hospital admissions because of self-harm among girls has risen by 68% in the past decade.
  • To increase the number of women and girls making music. Over the past decade, a reported 95% of Reading and Leeds festival line-ups have been dominated by male acts. 

 

London

Girls Rock London (GRL!) is a music project for girls and women in London.

GRL is part of a movement of rock camps that take place all over the world, united by a desire to achieve gender equality in the music industry and to ensure that all girls and women get the chance to make music. The aims of the project are to empower girls and women – regardless of previous musical experience – to write and perform music, and to build self-confidence.

The programme is a mixture of musical/technical tuition and workshops, which together help to build participants’ self-esteem and confidence, and provide a platform for girls and women to find and develop their voices. Rock Camp is all about trying new things, working together and making lots of NOISE…
NYMAZ Connect Resound clarinettist

Connect: Resound

North Yorkshire, United Kingdom

MMA Magazine: 'the Connect:Resound project is enabling hundreds of pupils to benefit from instrumental lessons that they would have not been able to receive using conventional face-to-face tuition.'

Connect:Resound Project Report

  • ''70.1% of the children enjoyed the lesson ‘very much’, 16.4% ‘quite a lot’, and 13.4% only ‘a bit’.'
  • '57.1% of parents/carers said their child enjoyed the lessons ‘very much’, 24.5% stated ‘quite a lot’, 14.3% suggested ‘a bit’ and 4.1% ‘not much.'
  • 'The vast majority of pupils (92.5%) reported practising between lessons. Parents were slightly less positive about the amounts of practice when this figure dropped to 83.7%.''
  • 'Parents gave positive feedback about children’s progress, with 24.5% stating it was ‘very good’, 46.9% that it was ‘good’, and 28.6% that progress was ‘satisfactory’.'
  • 'Most of the children (74.1%) and many parents (68.2%) wanted them to continue to learn their instruments ‘quite a lot’ or ‘very much’. This is notable considering that 79.5% of parents/carers would not have tried to find instrumental lessons for their children had this opportunity not been available.'

Connect:Resound Project Report

'I would very much recommend Connect: Resound as an avenue to access music lessons.' - Headteacher

'The children were engrossed in what they were doing…we are all very impressed with the concept… As a governor I feel there are huge opportunities offered through the internet for
geographically remote schools, small schools with very limited budgets (like ours) and also for specialised teaching, not just of music but of foreign languages… In short – brilliant project well executed.' - Kevin Tasker, School Governor, Hawes CP School

'Really good, actually […] especially the individuals got further than they would in a normal lesson. I think it was because of the kids, I think they really liked doing it over the internet.' - Andy, guitar teacher

'Well, the organisation of it, if the schools on board, it's so much easier […] North Yorkshire being massive and travelling and not getting there, so actually having lessons […] rather than running from school to school […] that was great, in the office, I couldn't
get stuck in traffic.' - Daniel, woodwind teacher

'And I think that has real potential there [for online], in an ideal world […] a combination of both, [an] initial [face-to-face] meeting with the teacher […] then maybe four or five lessons over the internet, and then you have another [face-to-face] meeting, […] I think it's got real potential for […] providing opportunity for those kids that can't, or are not sure about whether they want to do an instrument, to actually make a start.' - Ian Bangay, head, North Yorkshire County

  • To identify a cost-efficient, high quality method of enhancing the music education opportunities on offer to isolated areas.

Yorkshire and Humberside

Connect: Resound explores how digital technologies can be used in rurally isolated areas to provide instrumental tuition, access to live music performances and teacher training.

Developed by NYMAZ in partnership with UCan Play, the action research project explores how digital technologies can be used to deliver music education and enrichment activities to children living in rurally isolated areas.

The project also provides schools with virtual access to unique, inspiring and high-profile music experiences as well as offering online continuing professional development opportunities to teachers and music leaders.

Sistema Scotland

The Raploch Community Campus, Drip Road, Stirling, United Kingdom

A full list of supporters can be found on page 2 of Sistema Scotland's brochure

'[Big Noise] is helping to transform the lives of more than 400 pre-school and P1-P3 pupils at Claypotts Castle and St Pius primary schools, as well as in deprived areas in Stirling, Aberdeen and Glasgow. Hundreds have signed up in Douglas, making it the area with the biggest uptake in Scotland.'

'Ms Benedetti has long been a vocal supporter of music tuition, and is also a backer of the Sistema Scotland charity, which has established youth orchestras in Stirling, Glasgow, Dundee and Aberdeen.'
 

'[Lorrie] Heagy explained that she wants to travel back to Scotland because she would like to see how Sistema Scotland’s Big Noise program— where she learned how to create JAMM — has developed since she was there eight years ago. “(Big Noise) was a fairly new initiative when I was there. It was about two years old,” Heagy said. “I would love to see what I could learn from it now.”'

'Big Noise, delivered by the charity Sistema Scotland, aims to transform the lives of children living in disadvantaged areas through the delivery of a high quality, immersive and inclusive music education programme. Douglas is the fourth centre to open in Scotland joining others in Stirling, Glasgow and Aberdeen.'

  • Big Noise Raploch, Stirling, was established in 2008 and currently engages with almost 500 children and young people
  • Big Noise Govanhill, Glasgow, was established in 2013 and currently engages with almost 800 children
  • Big Noise Torry, Aberdeen, was established in 2015 and currently engages with almost 500 children
  • A typical Big Noise child can be involved in the programme for up to 11 hours a week, 45 weeks each year. That means almost 500 hours of intervention and support a year.

'Sistema Scotland’s Big Noise programme has the potential to significantly enhance participants’ lives, prospects, health and wellbeing through a variety of identified pathways in the long-term. [...] While Big Noise can appear to the casual observer to be like many other arts or music programmes, we encountered a number of factors which, when taken together, potentially make it unique – including its ambition, longevity, intensity and inclusivity.' - Professor Carol Tannahill, Director of the Glasgow Centre for Population Health

'(Child’s Name) can be hard to manage when he’s in my class. But the difference when a Big Noise musician came in! Because it was something he could do, you could just see in his eyes. …Being taught on the violin, he was just so proud of what he could do. That’s a child that stands out in my head for the impact there can be, on a child who’s very hard to reach, in many ways.' - Primary school teacher, Govanhill

'I have never seen a piece of work come into an area, target so many people and have such an impact in such a short period of time.' - NHS Manager, Glasgow

  • To transform children’s lives
  • To empower communities
  • To create a sustainable charity, with permanent benefits

Sistema Scotland is a charity on a mission to create permanent social change in some of the most deprived communities in Scotland.  We use participation in our Big Noise orchestra programmes to change lives by fostering confidence, discipline, teamwork, pride and aspiration in the children and young people taking part.  This enables the children and young people to reach their full potential, leading successful and fulfilled lives.  This philosophy has a knock on effect for their families and the wider community in general.

Our teams provide an intensive orchestral programme for school-age children and young people.  We use a variety of immersive music teaching methods delivered during school time, after school and during the school holidays.  We also provide opportunities for growth such as trips and residentials.  Regular performances help to keep the wider community as involved as possible.  There is no charge for the tuition, instruments, healthy snacks, trips, and t-shirts.

Altogether there are around 2,000 children and young people engaging regularly with the three established Sistema Scotland centres.  In addition to the Big Noise orchestras attended by children up to 11 hours each week, we run Baby Noise and Adult Noise programmes which enable the Sistema Scotland family to reach as many as possible in the communities where we are based.

NYMAZ

Clements Hall, Nunthorpe Road, York YO23 1BW, United Kingdom

About us

NYMAZ is a youth music development charity which champions the transformative potential of music for children and young people. We know that music has the power to change lives – it can raise aspirations, enable personal and social development, and enhance career prospects. Working with our trusted partners, we deliver high quality music-making activities across North Yorkshire to those in challenging circumstances, including rural isolation. We are also committed to strengthening the sector through workforce development, building strategic partnerships and advocating for the benefits of participatory music.

Operational since 2001, NYMAZ’s vision is that all young people in North Yorkshire will have the opportunity to actively engage in music, regardless of their circumstances. We are a strategic partner of Youth Music, one of only 13 in the country, working to create a musically-inclusive England. NYMAZ is a registered charity and company limited by guarantee.

Our Vision

Our vision is for a future where everybody benefits from the value of music.

We provide universal and targeted learner-led opportunities to create music. We supply training and tools to primary and secondary schools to help them transform mandatory music teaching, and we work in partnership to use the power of creating music to affect individual and social change.

Schools

  1. To refresh and embed our innovative learning models in the secondary sector through professional development, new approaches, resources and supporting and growing our network
  2. To develop and rollout a Musical Futures approach for primary school music
  3. To establish an annual professional development event delivered in partnership with others

Out of school settings

  1. To develop new partnerships to deliver professional development programmes for those working with disadvantaged young people
  2. To deliver an income-generating professional development Musical Futures programme for workplace learning

Consolidation

  1. To grow a sustainable income
  2. To strengthen networks nationally and internationally
  3. To build the Musical Futures brand in the UK and overseas
  4. To better understand our impact and outcomes

We are keen to work with partner organisations who share our vision. Please contact Abigail D’Amore if you would like to discuss working with us.

 

About the project

Ten Pieces aims to open up the world of classical music to 7-14 year-olds across the UK and inspire them to develop their own creative responses to the music.

  • Explore our ‘Ten Pieces’ films; these consist of ten performances of classical music – there are twenty pieces in total for you to use
  • You can watch the whole set of each Ten Pieces collection by ordering a free DVD box set or by viewing each performance separately. The performances are between two and ten minutes in duration
  • The pieces are supported by free downloadable teaching resources including lesson plans, composer information, cross-curricular resources and simplified orchestral arrangements
  • Catch up on what’s been happening in the last two jam-packed years in this clip and in our photo gallery
  • You can also look ahead and see the list of pieces selected for the 2017/18 academic year. New resources for this list will be launched for the next autumn term

Ten Pieces Champions are Music Education Hubs, Music Services, orchestras, film, dance and other arts organisations from across the UK working in collaboration with the BBC to introduce classical music to the next generation. They have signed up to Champion the project and work together on delivering music and arts education to every young person throughout the nations and regions.

Visit the Champions page and browse by region to find a Champion nearby.

If you’re an arts organisation that’s interested in becoming a champion you can email tenpieces@bbc.co.uk for an information pack and sign-up form.

'Lullaby' concert in CLS's Growth through Music programme © Paul Coghlin

Meet the Music

Piano House, Brighton Terrace, London SW9, United Kingdom

  • Bethlem and Maudsley Hospital School

  • Breathe Arts Health Research

  • The Christopher Rowbotham Charitable Trust
  • The Douglas Heath Eves Charitable Trust
  • The Dunhill Medical Trust

  • Evelina Hospital School

  • The February Foundation
  • Great Ormond Street Hospital School

  • Harrow Music Education Hub

  • Headway East London

  • The Human Trafficking Foundation
  • Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (King's College London)

  • Jewish Care

  • MariaMarina Foundation
  • Orchestras Live

  • Queen Mary University of London

  • The Richard Hickox Foundation
  • Royal Hospital for Neurodisability

  • St Joseph’s Hospice

  • Task Force Trust
  • Tower Hamlets Arts and Music Education Service (THAMES)

  • University College London Hospital School

  • "Some of the kids had never publicly performed before. It was a real milestone for their confidence. To be given the opportunity was just fantastic." Julia Schubert, Westgate Youth Group, Ipswich

 

  • To work in care homes, hospitals and hospices, honing the necessary skills to allow music to aid in the healing process and provide an outlet for those who need it most.
  • To work alongside local music hubs to deliver unique creative projects and first-time orchestral experiences with young people who have significantly lower levels of arts engagement.
  • To address the economic and cultural barriers that may prevent young people from discovering classical music, workshop participants work directly with our musicians to programme and produce a range of exciting and inspiring concerts.

City of London Sinfonia‘s Meet the Music programme spends over 170 days a year in the community making music with 14,000+ people.

Current Meet the Music projects include:

  • Wellbeing through Music. This takes place in healthcare settings, where City of London Sinfonia (CLS) musicians deliver performances, often at patients’ bedsides, as well as end-of-term projects for young children in major London teaching hospitals such as Great Ormond Street. They also undertake regular visits to care homes in North London, making music with Holocaust survivors or people suffering from dementia. Plans for the next three years include creating a body of research around the effectiveness of these projects, going beyond the anecdotal and providing clinical evidence as to their effectiveness.
  • Growth through Music. This sees CLS musicians working with very young children (aged 3-7) in communities that are geographically or economically isolated, including rural Suffolk and Tower Hamlets. Working closely with schools and music education hubs, CLS addresses a significant gap in provision for children at a crucial time in their academic and social development, performing for children and families through its Crash Bang Wallop! and Lullaby concert series and creating interactive first-time orchestral experiences for teenagers and young people through its First Time Live projects in collaboration with Orchestras Live.

Header photo: Lullaby concert in CLS’s Growth through Music programme © Paul Coghlin