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Creative industries and Music Manifesto veteran joins Nordoff Robbins board

Marc Jaffrey, who became a trustee of the charity officially in April, brings personal experiences of neurodiversity and dementia, as well as significant campaigning and strategic communications expertise

The national UK music therapy charity Nordoff Robbins has announced the appointment of former Music Manifesto Champion Marc Jaffrey OBE to the organisation’s board of trustees.

Jaffrey has 35 years’ experience as a creative leader of high-impact campaigns and large-scale change programmes in the creative industries, business, education, international development, social causes and the arts.

He led the Music Manifesto, the most successful arts campaign in UK history, attracting funding of £332m and driving large-scale improvements in the education system, and has been a senior independent adviser to the Secretaries of State at the DfE and DCMS. As a BBC commissioner he developed a portfolio of award-winning content and services.

Most recently, Marc Jaffrey has worked closely with the Neil Utley Foundation and UK Music on the Music for Dementia Power of Music campaign.

Nordoff Robbins Chief Executive Sandra Schembri said, ‘We are thrilled that Marc is joining us at a pivotal time in our charity’s development.

‘Marc’s unrivalled ability to connect dots strategically, his wealth of knowledge, and connections are an exciting combination and an ideal addition to our Board of Trustees as we review our position within the wider cultural sector.’

Marc Jaffrey said, ‘Anyone who has experienced or witnessed Nordoff Robbins’ work knows the unique life-changing music therapy they bring to such a wide range of people – from children with learning disabilities to adults with dementia.

‘Simply put, it is the power of music applied in the most valuable and enabling way. Nordoff Robbins and its approach are rightly revered and I’m thrilled to be joining the Board. I look forward to supporting the Board and brilliant Executive team to expand its reach and become better recognised as the national treasure it is.’