CME Unit 6B

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Section B: Learning Outcome 2 (LO 2)

Know what to do when your children or young people are ill or injured


Learning activity 3 – relating to Learning Outcome 2 (LO 2)

Read the following introductory information about Health and Safety and First Aid:

  1. As music educators working in a wide variety of settings (colleges, schools, nurseries, pupil referral units etc), whether self-employed, contracted, employed or volunteering, you must take responsibility for your own health and safety while on the premises of any establishment
  2. You have a duty of care to ensure that any activity undertaken by you does not cause any harm to the children and young people in your care or to other members of staff
  3. You must comply with the Health and Safety procedures of any establishment while you are on-site

However, this does not negate the establishment’s responsibility to you under the Health & Safety at Work Act 1974. The Act places overall responsibility for health and safety with the employer, for all employees as well as those who may be affected by work activities, such as pupils, visitors, parents and contractors.


Recording of accidents

All accidents, however minor, must be recorded. There are a number of reasons for this. It is a requirement under social security legislation. Employers need to satisfy all legal requirements for employees and non–employees and take measures to monitor accidents. This includes taking new steps to prevent further accidents or checking if a trend is developing. Records also have to be produced for the Health and Safety Executive, to parents and guardians, or in the course of civil proceedings if a claim is brought following an incident. Establishments should have clear guidelines on incident reporting and this should be made clear to staff on the first day of their work.

It can be confusing for music educators working in more than one establishment whose reporting and recording procedures vary. You should always ensure you have read and understood the policy and guidance for Health and Safety in the establishment you are working in. If this information is not automatically given to you when you first work in an establishment, make sure you request a copy (possibly in writing) and do read it.

Caution: A failure to follow the procedures in a school or other establishment can result in disciplinary action being taken against the music educator.


Being prepared

In addition to having acquainted yourself with the guidance and policy of any establishment you work in, there are some other simple steps all music educators can take to be prepared:

  1. If you work at home, you should ask parents and carers to let you know of any medical conditions affecting their child that you should be aware of.
  2. If you work at home, be sure you have emergency contact details for the parents / carers of those children or young people you teach.
  3. If you work alone at home, you might consider keeping a small first aid kit and have, at the very least, some basic first aid training
  4. If you work in schools or other establishments, once you have read their policies, you should know who and where the nearest first aider is in relation to your work location in the building.
  5. If you work in a school, ensure you know in advance if any of your students suffer from an ongoing medical condition e.g. asthma, epilepsy. You can and should request this information from your workplace. This may also include information on learning needs.

WHAT TO DO IF A CHILD OR YOUNG PERSON FALLS ILL DURING A LESSON IN AN ESTABLISHMENT

  1. Don’t panic.
  2. Make space around the injured child / young person. Clear any other children away from the sick / injured child.
  3. a. If teaching a group, send another child / young person, (or two, following the school’s policy) to seek another adult urgently.
    b. If teaching one to one, step outside the room and send another person to seek first assistance, and ask another child / young person or adult to join you in the room. You may need to use your mobile phone to call the school office.
  4. Gently talk to the injured child / young person, reassure them help is coming.
  5. Avoid touching unless absolutely necessary.
  6. If you work privately, call the parent(s) / carer(s) and tell them what has happened.
  7. If required, call 999 immediately.
  8. If a child or young person has fainted, make sure there is fresh air – are windows open?
  9. If a child or young person is cut, raise that part of the body that is bleeding.
  10. Only treat the child or young person if you are willing, and trained to do so.
  11. Explain to the child or young person what you are doing and why.

DO NOT

  • Attempt any first aid yourself in a school setting, unless you are a designated and trained first aider.
  • Move an unconscious child or young person, wait for first aid to arrive.

Afterwards, when the child or young person has recovered / been treated

  • If you work in a school or other institution you MUST complete their accident report form, that day, and present it to the relevant person. Request a copy, and confirmation of receipt of the completed form.

WHAT TO DO IF A CHILD OR YOUNG PERSON FALLS ILL DURING A LESSON IN YOUR HOME.

  1. Don’t panic.
  2. Make space around the injured child / young person. Clear any other children away from the sick / injured child.
  3. Gently talk to the injured child / young person, assess how urgent the need for first aid is.
  4. If you work privately call the parent(s) / carer(s) and tell them what has happened
    OR  If required, call 999 immediately.
  5. If a child or young person has fainted, make sure there is fresh air – are windows open?
  6. If a child or young person is cut, raise that part of the body that is bleeding.
  7. Only treat a child or young person if you are willing and trained to do so.
  8. Explain to the child or young person what you are doing and why.

With this in mind, do you have any comments about the following scenarios?

Write your first thoughts in the boxes, then reflect on the view you have taken and, if possible, discuss with co-learners.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Useful references and supporting material can be found here:


Now move on to Section C.

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